Extraneous Articulations

Val+ste+Tub (2)

I must give credit where credit is due. This page was inspired by my very own Steven, named ‘The walking, talking, dictionary’ in kindergarten. Having shared my love for words, he was, and is, the motivating factor behind these articulations.

Here is the story of The Three Little Pigs, told as though we had the vocabulary to understand it – It’s rippin’ hilarious!

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Since I do want to succeed, I will give a simple word:

Success
suh k-ses
noun:
1. the favorable or prosperous termination of attempts or endeavors; theaccomplishment of one’s goals.
2. the attainment of wealth, position, honors, or the like.
3. a performance or achievement that is marked by success, as by theattainment of honors:

The play was an instant success.
4. a person or thing that has had success, as measured by attainment ofgoals, wealth, etc.:

She was a great success on the talk show.
5. Obsolete. outcome.
Origin:
1530-40; < Latin successus, equivalent to succēd-, stem of succēdere tosucceed + -tus suffix of v. action, with dt > ss
Synonyms
2. achievement, fame, triumph.

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As my sorrow is poignant, so is the word I will use on this heart-wrenching day

 

Poignant

poin-yuhnt, poi-nuhnt

 

Adjective:

1. keenly distressing to the feelings: poignant regret.

2. keen or strong in mental appeal: a subject of poignant interest.

3. affecting or moving the emotions: a poignant scene.

4. pungent to the smell: poignant cooking odors.

 

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English poynaunt  < Middle French poignant,  present participle of poindre  < Latin pungere  to prick, pierce.
Related forms

poign·ant·ly, adverb

un·poign·ant, adjective

un·poign·ant·ly, adverb

 

Synonyms
1. intense, sincere, heartfelt. 4. piquant, sharp.

Word Origin & History

Late 14c., “painful to physical or mental feeling,” from O.Fr. poignant (13c.), prp. of poindre “to prick, sting,” from L. pungere “to prick”.

 

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Writing tonight and found this one – let’s hear it for just the right word in a paragraph! I used to pronounce it psycho – phant, you know, like a psychotic elephant, but no more, now I know, it’s more like a sick elephant – poor elephant!

Sycophant

syc·o·phant

[sik-uh-fuhnt, -fant, sahy-kuh-] Show IPA

noun

a self-seeking, servile flatterer; fawning parasite.

Origin:

1530–40;  < Latin sȳcophanta  < Greek sȳkophántēs  informer, equivalent to sŷko ( n ) fig + phan-  (stem of phaínein  to show) + -tēs  agentive suffix

World English Dictionary

sycophant  (ˈsɪkəfənt)

— n

a person who uses flattery to win favour from individuals wielding influence; toady

[C16: from Latin sӯcophanta,  from Greek sukophantēs,  literally: the person showing a fig, apparently referring to the fig sign used in making an accusation, from sukon  fig + phainein  to show; sense probably developed from “accuser” to “informer, flatterer”]

‘sycophancy

— n

Word Origin & History

1537 (in L. form sycophanta), “informer, talebearer, slanderer,” from L. sycophanta, from Gk. sykophantes, originally “one who shows the fig,” from sykon “fig” + phanein “to show.” “Showing the fig” was a vulgar gesture made by sticking the thumb between two fingers, a display which vaguely resembles

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Anonymity

an·o·nym·i·ty

[an-uh-nim-i-tee]

Noun

1. The state or quality of being anonymous.

2. An anonymous person: some fine poetry attributed to anonymities.

Origin

1810–20; anonym(ous) + -ity, or < French anonymité

Related forms

non·an·o·nym·i·ty, noun

World English Dictionary

 

Anonymous (əˈnɒnɪməs)

— adj

 

1. From or by a person, author, etc, whose name is unknown or withheld: an anonymous letter

2. Having no known name

3. Lacking individual characteristics; unexceptional

4. Denoting an organization which provides help to applicants who remain anonymous: (Often capital) Alcoholics Anonymous

[C17: via Late Latin from Greek anōnumos,  from an-  + onoma  name]

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This is actually one of my favorite words, not only because of its meaning, but because it sounds cool rolling off my tongue…

Myriad

myr·i·ad

[mir-ee-uhd]

Noun

1. A very great or indefinitely great number of persons or things.

2. Ten thousand.

Adjective

3. Of an indefinitely great number; innumerable: the myriad stars of a summer night.

4. Having innumerable phases, aspects, variations, etc.: the myriad mind of Shakespeare.

5. Ten thousand.

Origin:

1545–55;  < Greek mȳriad-  (stem of mȳriás ) ten thousand

Related forms

myr·i·ad·ly, adverb

Synonyms

4. countless, boundless, infinite, untold.

World English Dictionary

Myriad (ˈmɪrɪəd)

— adj

1.         innumerable

— n

2.         ( also used in plural ) a large indefinite number

3.         archaic  ten thousand

[C16: via Late Latin from Greek murias  ten thousand]

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Found this while looking up synonyms on thesaurus.com

con·tu·ma·cious

[kon-too-mey-shuhs, -tyoo-]

Adjective

-stubbornly perverse or rebellious; willfully and obstinately disobedient.

Origin:
1590–1600; contumacy + -ous

Synonyms:
contrary, pigheaded, factious, refractory, headstrong, intractable.

World English Dictionary

contumacious  (ˌkɒntjʊˈmeɪʃəs)

adj

– stubbornly resistant to authority; wilfully obstinate

-contu’maciously

— adv

-contu’maciousness

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Id

noun Psychoanalysis .

the part of the psyche, residing in the unconscious, that is the source of instinctive impulses that seek satisfaction in accordance with the pleasure principle and are modified by the ego and the superego before they are given overt expression.

Origin:
1920–25;  < Latin id  it, as a translation of German Es,  special use of es  it, as a psychoanalytic term

World English Dictionary

id 1  (ɪd)

n

psychoanal  the mass of primitive instincts and energies in the unconscious mind that, modified by the ego and the superego, underlies all psychic activity

[C20: New Latin, from Latin: it; used to render German Es ]

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From my post on clouds:

undulate

Verb

1. to move with a sinuous or wavelike motion; display a smooth rising-and-falling or side-to-side alternation of movement: The flag undulates in the breeze.

2. to have a wavy form or surface; bend with successive curves in alternate directions.

3. (of a sound) to rise and fall in pitch: the wail of a siren undulating in the distance.

verb (used with object)

4. to cause to move in waves.

5. to give a wavy form to.

Adjective

6. Also, un·du·lat·ed. having a wavelike or rippled form, surface, edge, etc.; wavy.

 

Origin:
1650–60;  < Latin undulātus  waved, equivalent to und ( a ) wave + -ul ( a ) -ule + -ātus -ate1

Related Words:

cockle, riffle, ripple, ruffle, roll

World English Dictionary

wavy  (ˈweɪvɪ)

adj, wavier , waviest

1.    abounding in or full of waves

2.    moving or proceeding in waves or undulations

3.    (of hair) set in or having waves and curls

4.   unstable or wavering

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This will be a double whammy…

In order to understand the word solemnity, you must first know what solemn means, so our first order of business:

Solemn:

Adjective

1. grave, sober, or mirthless, as a person, the face, speech, tone, or mood: solemn remarks.

2. gravely or somberly impressive; causing serious thoughts or a grave mood: solemn music.

3. serious or earnest: solemn assurances.

4. characterized by dignified or serious formality, as proceedings; of a formal or ceremonious character: a solemn occasion.

5. made in due legal or other express form, as a declaration or agreement: a solemn oath.

Synonyms
1. unsmiling, serious. 2. august, imposing, stately. 4. ritual, ceremonial. 6. devotional, sacred.

Related Words: grave, sedate, sober, earnest, in earnest

And my new additional recourse:

Collins World English Dictionary

— adj

  1. characterized or marked by seriousness or sincerity: a solemn vow
  2. characterized by pomp, ceremony, or formality
  3. serious, glum, or pompous;
  4. inspiring awe: a solemn occasion;
  5. performed with religious ceremony
  6. gloomy or sombre: solemn colours

Origin:

From Old French solempne,  from Latin sōllemnis  appointed, perhaps from sollus  whole.

And now, the original word I looked up:

Solemnity

Noun:

1. the state or character of being solemn; earnestness; gravity; impressiveness: the solemnity of a state funeral.

2. Often, solemnities. a solemn observance, ceremonial proceeding, or special formality: the solemnities of Easter.

3. Law. a formality that renders an act or document valid.

Related Words: solemnity, sedateness, solemnness, staidness, gravity

World English Dictionary

Solemnity

— n  , pl -ties

1. the state or quality of being solemn

2. (often plural ) solemn ceremony, observance, celebration, etc

3. law  a formality necessary to validate a deed, act, contract, etc

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English solempnete  < Old French  < Latin sollemnitās,  equivalent to sollemnis

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Used the word to describe a scene, thought it would be a great post.

Annihilate

Verb: [uh-nahy-uh-leyt]

1. To reduce to utter ruin or nonexistence; destroy utterly.

2. To destroy the collective existence or main body of; wipe out: to annihilate an army.

3. To annul; make void: to annihilate a law.

4. To cancel the effect of; nullify.

5. To defeat completely; vanquish: Our basketball team annihilated the visiting team.

Synonyms:
Ravage, devastate, desolate, smash, obliterate, demolish.

Related Words:

Carry off, decimate, eliminate, eradicate, extinguish

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English adnichilat ( e ) destroyed < Late Latin annihilātus  brought to nothing, annihilated (past participle of annihilāre ) ( Latin an- an-2  + nihil  nothing + -ātus -ate1 )

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Reading through a contract I found a word I did not know, which is not unheard of but rare. Of course I had to look it up and of course I will share…

Anathema

Noun:

1. A person or thing detested or loathed: That subject is anathema to him.

2. A person or thing accursed or consigned to damnation or destruction.

3. A formal ecclesiastical curse involving excommunication.

4. Any imprecation of divine punishment.

5. A curse; execration.

Origin:
1520–30;  < Latin  < Greek:  a thing accursed, devoted to evil, orig. devoted, equivalent to ana ( ti ) thé ( nai ) to set up + -ma  noun suffix

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I overheard someone talking about her doppelganger and decided it would be a great word to share. I’ve heard it used before but never really knew the meaning. Now I do.

Doppelganger

noun

A ghostly double or counterpart of a living person.

Origin:
1850–55;  German:  literally, double-walker

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You can look up these words and more at Dictionary.com

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For the many injured in the tragic bombing by the cowards in Boston

Diversity

noun:

1. The state or fact of being diverse; difference; unlikeness: diversity of opinion.

2. Variety; multiformity.

3. A point of difference.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English diversite  < Anglo-French  < Latin dīversitās.  See diverse, -ity

Synonyms
change, difference, variation, dissimilarity.

Related Words

diverseness, multifariousness, variety

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This is actually from my book.

Appropriate

adjective

1. Suitable or fitting for a particular purpose, person, occasion, etc.: an appropriate example; an appropriate dress.
2. Belonging to or peculiar to a person; proper: Each played his appropriate part.

verb (used with object)

3. To set apart, authorize, or legislate for some specific purpose or use: The legislature appropriated funds for the university.
4. To take to or for oneself; take possession of.
5. To take without permission or consent; seize; expropriate: He appropriated the trust funds for himself.
6. To steal, especially to commit petty theft.
Origin:
1515–25;  < Late Latin appropriātus  made one’s own (past participle of appropriāre ), equivalent to Latin ap- ap-1  + propri ( us ) one’s own + -ātus -ate1
Synonyms
1. befitting, apt, meet, felicitous, suited, proper, due, becoming, pertinent. 3. apportion, allocate, assign.
Antonyms
1. unsuitable, inept.

Related Words

allow, earmark, reserve, set aside, advantageous

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This also is one of my favorite words-even named one of my dogs Zephyr!

Zephyr

noun

1. A gentle, mild breeze.

2. Literary. the west wind.

3. Any of various things of fine, light quality, as fabric, yarn, etc.

Origin:

Before 1000 for def 2; Middle English  < Latin zephyrus  < Greek zéphyros  the west wind; replacing Middle English zeferus, zephirus, Old English zefferus  < Latin  as above

Synonyms

1. See wind

 Related Words

air, breeze, gentle wind

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This word came from somewhere. At times I have dialogs in my head and words that I’ve heard or read pop in. Most of the time I know what context to use them, but still I must look them up to know their exact meaning. Today’s word is:

Propensity as in ‘Your propensity to get into trouble astounds even me!’

noun

1. A natural inclination or tendency: a propensity to drink too much.
2. Obsolete . favorable disposition or partiality.
Origin:
1560–70; propense + -ity
Synonyms
1. bent, leaning, disposition, penchant, proclivity.
Related Words

leaning, tendency, proclivity, aptness

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Another favorite word. Learned it from a book by Piers Anthony; it is actually the name of one of the books in his Apprentice Adept series.

Juxtaposition

Noun

1. An act or instance of placing close together or side by side, especially for comparison or contrast.

2. The state of being close together or side by side.

Origin:

1655–65;  < French  < Latin juxtā  side by side + French position

Related forms

jux·ta·po·si·tion·al, adjective

Related Words

apposition, collocation

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Michael actually gave this word to me. I thought it was an excellent choice therefore it is here.

Tumultuous

adjective

1. Full of tumult or riotousness; marked by disturbance and uproar: a tumultuous celebration.
2. Raising a great clatter and commotion; disorderly or noisy: a tumultuous crowd of students.

3. Highly agitated, as the mind or emotions; distraught; turbulent.

Origin:
1540–50;  < Latin tumultuōsus,  equivalent to tumultu ( s ) tumult + -ōsus -ous
Synonyms
1. uproarious, turbulent, violent.
2. boisterous.
3. unquiet.
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I was told that cursing was the sign of an uneducated mind. I figure people swear because they don’t have a better vocabulary. Not that I’m completely swear free, but I try. So, in that context I’m using a better word for swearing, cursing, cussing… you get it.

Expletive

noun

1. An interjectory word or expression, frequently profane; an exclamatory oath.
2. A syllable, word, or phrase serving to fill out.
3. Grammar . a word considered as regularly filling the syntactic position of another, as it  in It is his duty to go,  or there  in There is nothing here.

adjective

4. Also, ex·ple·to·ry added merely to fill out a sentence or line, give emphasis, etc.: Expletive remarks padded the speech.
Origin:
1600–10;  < Late Latin explētīvus  serving to fill out, equivalent to Latin explēt ( us ) filled, filled up (past participle of explēre) + -īvus – ive

As you can see, not all expletives are swearwords and not all swearwords are expletives. So my opinion… gain a greater vocabulary and stop swearing.

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I posted it in a comment, now I’ll share it’s meaning:

Incognito

adjective
1. Having one’s identity concealed, as under an assumed name, especially to avoid notice or formal attentions.

adverb

2. With the real identity concealed: to travel incognito.

noun

3. A person who is incognito.
4. The state of being incognito.
5. The disguise or character assumed by an incognito.
Origin:
1630–40;  < Italian  < Latin incognitus  unknown, equivalent to in+ cognitus,  past participle of cognōscere  to get to know
Synonyms
1. disguised, undisclosed, unidentified.
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In honor of Easter, the word I chose is

Leporidae

noun

1. An animal of the family Leporidae, comprising the rabbits and hares.

adjective

2. Belonging or pertaining to the family Leporidae.
Origin:
< Neo-Latin Leporidae  name of the family, equivalent to Lepor-,  stem of Lepus  the type genus ( Latin:  hare)
To find out the difference between bunny’s, rabbits, and hares (OH MY!), Visit the commentary on it at dictionary.com
Just a thought… Does the name (leporid…) mean that they (bunnies) are really a sub-family of leopard’s and are actually vicious creatures incognito?
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This one’s for Michael. He showed me a great sight today; it’s a list of unusual words. From this sight I found my next word. Don’t know when I’ll actually get to use it, but hey… at least I know it!

Zeitgeber

noun

an environmental cue, as the length of daylight or the degree of temperature, that helps to regulate the cycles of an organism’s biological clock.
Origin: 
1970–75;  < German  (1954), literally, time-giver, on the model of Taktgeber  an electronic synchronizationdevice

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This is one of the many vocabulary words from my book:

Inundated

verb (used with object), in·un·dat·ed, in·un·dat·ing.

1. To flood; cover or overspread with water; deluge.
2. To overwhelm: inundated with letters of protest.
Origin:
1615–25;  < Latin inundātus,  past participle of inundāre  to flood, overflow, equivalent to in + und ( a ) wave + -ātus
Synonyms
2. glut.
Related Words:
engulfed, flooded, overcome, overpowered, overwhelmed
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Sometimes I hear or see a word and think I know what it means, then look it up and am surprised by the answer. This is not one of them.

Ludicrous

Adjective

Causing laughter because of absurdity; provoking or deserving derision; ridiculous; laughable: a ludicrous lack of efficiency.
Origin
1610–20;  < Latin lūdicrus  sportive, equivalent to lūdicr ( um ) a show, public games ( lūdi-,  stem of lūdere  to play, + -crum  noun suffix of instrument or result) + -us -ous
Related Words
farcical, ridiculous, absurd, cockeyed, dirisory
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This is one of my favorite words, though I must admit, I’ve been saying it wrong, but no longer. The word is

Lackadaisical

Adjective

1. Without interest, vigor, or determination; listless; lethargic: a lackadaisical attempt.

2. Lazy; indolent: a lackadaisical fellow.

Origin:
1760–70; lackadais ( y ) (variant of lackaday) + -ical

Related Words

dreamy, languid, languorous

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3/16 Dad-gummit, this keeps happening! Ah well, I s’pose even the lively of us need to sleep. The word I chose was actually a antonym to a previous word… check it out and you’ll see which!!

Languid

Adjective

1. Lacking in vigor or vitality; slack or slow: a languid manner.
2. Lacking in spirit or interest; listless; indifferent.
3. Drooping or flagging from weakness or fatigue; faint.
Origin:
1590–1600;  < Latin languidus  faint. See languish, -id4
Synonyms
1. inactive, inert, sluggish, torpid. 2. spiritless. 3. weak, feeble, weary, exhausted, debilitated.
Antonyms
1. active, energetic. 3. vigorous.

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3/14

Brusque, the word is brusque.

Adjective

Abrupt in manner; blunt; rough: A brusque welcome greeted his unexpected return.
Also, brusk.
Origin:
1595–1605;  < Middle French  < Italian brusco  rough, tart, special use of brusco  (noun) butcher’s broom < Late Latin brūscum,  for Latin rūscus, rūscum,  perhaps conflated with Vulgar Latin *brūcus  heather.
Synonyms
Unceremonious, short, curt.

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3/13 – epic fail!

Second verse, same as the first. I don’t know what happened, but my post didn’t save; so, for the sake of saving face, I will try again.

Seein’ as how yesterday’s word didn’t get posted, today I will post two, one suggestion from each of my sons;

The first word came at the suggestion of Michael:

Tranquility

Noun

Quality or state of being tranquil; calmness; peacefulness; quiet; serenity.
Origin:
1325–75; Middle English tranquillite  < Latin tranquillitās.
Related Words:
Placidity, quiet, repose, serenity

And the second, from Steven:

Brisk

Adjective
1. Quick and active; lively: brisk trading; a brisk walk.
2. Sharp and stimulating: brisk weather; brisk wind.
3. (Of liquors) effervescing vigorously: brisk cider.
4. Abrupt; curt: I was surprised by her rather brisk tone.

Verb

5. To make or become brisk; liven up.
Synonyms
1. Spry, energetic, alert.
Antonyms
1. Languid.

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3/11 – Happy Birthday Bill!

I thought of a good word this morning but I was driving when I thought of it, therefore didn’t write it down, so today’s word has no spectacular interest or introduction. Just something I heard years ago and liked the sound of it.

Acrimonious

adjective

Caustic, stinging, or bitter in nature speech, behavior, etc.: an acrimonious answer; an acrimonious dispute.
Origin:
1605–15;  < Medieval Latin ācrimōniōsus.
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3/10/13

This word came from one of my favorite movies Labyrinth; I had to look it up then, and decided to share it now… and just for your gee whiz collection I’ll add it’s origin, since it contains additional information that I found rather interesting.

Oubliette

noun

A secret dungeon with an opening only in the ceiling, as in certain old castles.
Origin:
1810–20;  < French, Middle French,  equivalent to oubli ( er ) to forget, Old French oblider  < Vulgar Latin *oblītāre,  derivative of Latin oblītus  (past participle of oblīvīscī  to forget) + Middle French -ette

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3/9/13

This word came from the pilot of the television show Teen Wolf; a word that not even I knew until today.

Litigious

adjective

1. Of or pertaining to litigation.
2. Excessively or readily inclined to litigate: a litigious person.
3. Inclined to dispute or disagree; argumentative.
Synonyms
Contentious, disputatious, quarrelsome.

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3/8/13

Today’s word is precarious, because my teenagers seem to continually find themselves in precarious situations!!

adjective

1. Dependent on circumstances beyond one’s control; uncertain; unstable; insecure: a precarious livelihood.
2. Dependent on the will or pleasure of another; liable to be withdrawn or lost at the will of another: He held a precarious tenure under an arbitrary administration.
3. Exposed to or involving danger; dangerous; perilous; risky: the precarious life of an underseas diver.

4. Having insufficient, little, or no foundation: a precarious assumption.

Synonyms
1. Unsure, unsteady. See uncertain.
2. doubtful, dubious, unreliable, undependable.
3. hazardous.
4. groundless, baseless, unfounded.
Antonyms
1. secure.
2. reliable.
3. safe.
4. well-founded.

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Extraneous

adjective

1. Introduced or coming from without; not belonging or proper to a thing; external; foreign: extraneous substances in our water.

2. Not pertinent; irrelevant: an extraneous remark; extraneous decoration.

Synonyms
1. Extrinsic, adventitious, alien. 2. inappropriate, nonessential, superfluous.
Articulation

noun

1. An act or the process of articulating: the articulation of a form; the articulation of a new thought.

2. Phonetics

   a. the act or process of articulating speech.
   b. the adjustments and movements of speech organs involved in pronouncing a particular sound, taken as a whole.
   c. any one of these adjustments and movements.
   d. any speech sound, especially a consonant.

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